Gardenproud Blog

Posts Tagged ‘Gardening Tips’

Your Gardening Questions -1

Tuesday, April 7th, 2015

- Do you have any advice about pruning wisterias?

Wisteria should be pruned twice a year Jan/Feb and July/August. With winter pruning you can cut back to within 2-3 buds of the main plant structure.

In the summer prune back the whippy shoots, tie back plant into trellis, cutting back to c 5 buds from main structure. With older plants you can cut back further, removing areas where the plant over hangs windows and twist around drain pipes. For further advice see RHS website.


- What is the best way to deal with bulbs once they are over?

Dead head the flower heads after they have bloomed, then leave the plants. The main strategy here is to allow the plants to put it’s energy back into the bulb for next years growth. After a while the stem and leaves will turn brown, then you can cut back and trim off the dead foliage.

- We have recently had a large tree removed from a bank in our garden. Do you have any suggestions for a shrub to replace this?

Berberis is  a large shrub with deep red foliage and all round year colour. The variety – Berberis “Superba” has beautiful purple colouring. It is a vigorous, deciduous shrub. With new bronze red growth, yellow-orange flowers in the Spring then red berries in the Autumn. It can be used as an individual shrub, or hedge. It contrasts well with green hedge plants and adjoining shrubs. It will grow to 2-3m in height.

For further information, or to ask any further questions please contact Tim Sykes at Gardenproud, you can contact him by email at info@reallygardenproud.com

It’s November and what’s happening in the garden?

Saturday, November 1st, 2014

By Tim Sykes

Looking good in our garden at the moment are the Sedum Autumn Joy, and if you have them so will Sedum Iceberg.

Verbena Bonarensis can also still be looking the business.

I love the look of Hydrangeas as the flower heads turn from their full bloom colour to the slightly shabby chick hues. We tend to cut the flower heads off now and use them in doors as flower arrangements.

Our variegated Holly standard looks stunning with its fresh red berries. Even the Dahlias are often still in bloom. The odd rose lingers on through October and November. If you have rose climbers now is the time to prune them. A good guide on rose pruning can be found on the BBC Gardening website.

The trees had a particularly heavy leaf cover this year, so you can expect to have a lot of leaves to clear up this November. We tend to clear the leaves as we go rather than wait for one fall. A good strong blower, a soft plastic rake and bulk bags are probably the best tools to use. You can also purchase rather nifty hand grabbers – Yeoman make a pair around £10 from Greenfingers.com.  Regular clearance of the leaves helps minimise any damage to lawns. However in some instances where the gardens are so vast we have taken to mulching the leaves using our big rotary mowers and spreading the shredded leaves across the lawns. There is a school of thought that this helps put nutrients back into the lawn surface.

Talking of which it’s time to make that final cut of the lawn, then clean your mower for winter storage and servicing.

Typically the best time to be planting out larger shrubs, trees and hedging before the Winter sets in. For inspiration you might take a trip to nearby Sheffield Park, Uckfield, or English Woodlands nursery in Heathfield where you can also buy the plants.

The Autumn is also a good time to be trimming and shaping your hedges, so remember to get the hedge trimmer out, or ask your gardener to check them.

Plant containers and hanging baskets with winter flowering bedding plants including pansies and my favourite cyclamen. The cyclamen looks good in pots, but also can be planted out and will flower right through the Winter. Favourite places are under trees and in rockeries.

Don’t forget to get those Spring bulbs out there.

We’ve bought a whole variety of tulip bulbs to be planted in our front garden beds, and November is the best time to plant tulips.

Our choice for next Spring includes:

Blue Spectacle, which give a beautiful bluey lilac multi-petalled flower head

Little Beauty, a rather delicate small crimson flower

Tres Chic, with it’s distinctive white tuber shaped petals

Queen of Night, that famous black tulip which looks stunning planted in concentrated patterns, often seen mixed with fennel

There are good ranges in most of the local nurseries. We bought ours at Notcutts in Tunbridge Wells.

For any advice or further information about gardening and gardening design contact Tim Sykes on 07725 173820 or, at info@reallygardenproud.com

Remember to wrap up warm, and enjoy November in the garden.